Protecting your Online Medical Records

October is Cybersecurity Awareness Month!

Week 3 2020

Do Your Part.  Be CyberSmart

By Christina Belfiglio

Patient medical portals are great tools that have helped our healthcare providers to meet an unprecedented moment in healthcare, due to the Covid-19 pandemic.  They became crucial for patients who could not engage with their providers in person and patient usage overall has increased in 2020.  The sites provide patients access to medical records, prescription information as well as the ability to communicate with your physician, schedule appointments, and make payments.

Is a Patient Medical Portal Secure?

I recently had this conversation with a physician.  She assured me that in their database, even she was not able to see her personal records when logged in with her physician credentials.  Physicians, nurses, and staff are given strict permissions to only allow them to view the records of their patients or what is required to perform  their job.  If she were to attempt to access her own records with her employee credentials the attempt would be flagged, her access denied, and repercussions would follow.
 

There are questions we can ask to help us decide if we want to participate in a healthcare portal.  Questions such as:

  1. Is the portal encrypted?  The antivirus company, Norton, explains encryption as “the process that scrambles readable text so it can only be read by the person who has the secret code, or decryption key.  It helps provide data security for sensitive information.”
  2. Are NIST (National Institute of Standards & Technology) or an equivalent set of standardized security recommendations followed?
  3. Is Multifactor authentication required?  Multifactor Authentication requires multiple methods to ensure the person signing in is who they say they are.  For example, a log-in/password as well as thumbprint or verification code sent via a previously provided phone number, text message or email address.
  4. Can I request a Proxy account for my caregiver or significant other to access my records? and Can I limit what my caregiver or significant other can access?
  5. Are access controls at your institution granted on an individual basis?  For example, do Doctors & nurses have different access rights than administrators?

Some other aspects to consider when using medical portals.

When creating your login always use a unique password.  Only access your account from a known and protected connection.  Public wifi is not safe to use when logging into accounts containing personal information.

Do Your Part. #BeCyberSmart

Norton https://us.norton.com/internetsecurity-privacy-what-is-encryption.html

October is Cybersecurity Awareness Month! Week 2 – 2020

The year 2020 saw major changes to the way many of us work, learn, and socialize online. Our homes and businesses are more dependent on the internet than ever. With more people now working from home, our personal and professional lives are more connected than ever, introducing a completely new set of potential security vulnerabilities.

During week two of National Cybersecurity Awareness Month (NCSAM), consumers and businesses are encouraged to focus on the steps users and organizations can take to protect their internet-connected devices for both personal and professional use

Securing Devices at Home and Work

More and more of our home devices—including thermostats, door locks, coffee machines, and smoke alarms—are now connected to the Internet. This enables us to control our devices on our smartphones, no matter our location, which in turn can save us time and money while providing convenience and even safety.

These advances in technology are innovative and intriguing, however they also pose a new set of security risks.

#BeCyberSmart to connect with confidence and protect your digital home.

SIMPLE TIPS

• Secure your Wi-Fi Network.

Your home’s wireless router is the primary entrance for cybercriminals to access all of your connected devices. Secure your Wi-Fi network and your digital devices by changing the factory-set default password and username. For more information about protecting your home network, check out the National Security Agency’s Cybersecurity Information page.

• Double you login protection.

Enable multi-factor authentication (MFA) to ensure that the only person who has access to your account is you. Use it for email, banking, social media, and any other service that requires logging in. If MFA is an option, enable it by using a trusted mobile device such as your smartphone, an authenticator app, or a secure token—a small physical device that can hook onto your key ring. Read the Multi-Factor Authentication (MFA) How-to-Guide for more information.

• If you connect, you must protect.

Whether it’s your computer, smartphone, game device, or other network devices, the best defense is to stay on top of things by updating to the latest security software, web browser, and operating systems. If you have the option to enable automatic updates to defend against the latest risks, turn it on. And, if you’re putting something into your device, such as a USB for an external hard drive, make sure your device’s security software scans for viruses and malware. Finally, protect your devices with antivirus software and be sure to periodically back up any data that cannot be recreated such as photos or personal documents.

• Keep tabs on your apps.

Most connected appliances, toys, and devices are supported by a mobile application. Your mobile device could be filled with suspicious apps running in the background or using default permissions you never realized you approved——gathering your personal information without your knowledge while also putting your identity and privacy at risk. Check your app permissions and use the “rule of least privilege” to delete what you don’t need or no longer use. Learn to just say “no” to privilege requests that don’t make sense. Only download apps from trusted vendors and sources.

• Never click and tell.

Limit what information you post on social media—from personal addresses to where you like to grab coffee. What many people don’t realize is that these seemingly random details are all that criminals need to know to target you, your loved ones, and your physical belongings—online and in the real world. Keep Social Security numbers, account numbers, and passwords private, as well as specific information about yourself, such as your full name, address, birthday, and even vacation plans. Disable location services that allow anyone to see where you are— and where you aren’t —at any given time.

October is Cybersecurity Awareness Month!

Do Your Part. Be CyberSmart

2020 – Week 1

If You Connect it, Protect it.

by Terri McDermott

The line between our online and offline lives has become indistinguishable. Our computers, smartphones, cars, home security systems, wearable devices, and other tools are part of our daily routine. For many of us, this may seem to have happened very quickly. But our children have not lived in a world where computers and the Internet did not exist. To them, this Internet of Things (IoT) or smart devices that send and receive data in an instant is normal.

New Internet-connected devices do provide a level of convenience in our lives, but they require that we share more information than ever.  The security of this information, and the security of these devices, is not always guaranteed. We’re using a variety of networks, each with differing levels of protection – at home, public Wi-Fi, our place of work. Some of these networks are well protected; others may not be protected at all. Once your device connects to the Internet, you and your device could potentially be vulnerable to all sorts of risks.  Think of the applications and information we are accessing, such as bank accounts, social media, online shopping, health and medical services, and business applications.  With more of this IoT entering our homes and our workplaces each day, it is important that everyone knows how to secure their digital lives.

No matter what devices you are using, the best defense is to regularly update them with the latest security software, web browser, and operating systems. If you have the option to enable automatic updates to defend against the latest risks, turn it on.  Here are some tips:

  • Shake up your password protocol. Change your device’s factory security settings from the default password. This is one of the most important steps to take in the protection of IoT devices. According to NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) guidance, consider using the longest password or passphrase permissible. Get creative and create a unique password for each of your IoT devices.  
  • Keep tabs on your apps. Many connected appliances, toys, and devices are supported by a mobile application. Your mobile device could be filled with apps running in the background or using default permissions you never realized you approved— gathering your personal information without your knowledge while also putting your identity and privacy at risk. Check your app permissions and learn to just say “no” to privilege requests that don’t make sense. Only download apps from trusted vendors and sources.
  • Secure your network. Properly secure the wireless network you use to connect Internet-enabled devices. Consider placing these devices on a separate and dedicated network. For more information on how you can secure your network, view the National Security Agency’s Cybersecurity Information page. (https://nsa.gov)

If you connect, you must protect. Keeping the digital world secure requires all of us to be proactive and diligent. Learn more about how you can at staysafeonline.org

Real Estate Market Update From our Managing Partner

Many of you may have read this recent article in the  New York Times:

In Coming Wave of Pandemic-Induced Vacancies, Some See Opportunity

The Times made a number of important points, but if you didn’t read closely, it would be easy to conclude that retail space is no longer viable—both for shoppers and investors. Not true. 

First let’s look at the facts: 

  • Retail space is contracting. Over 7,700 stores totaling 115 million square feet are expected to close this year according to data provided by CoStar Advisory Services.  
  • Most retail closures will be in malls, which were struggling long before the pandemic pushed department stores like J.C. Penney and Neiman Marcus into bankruptcy. 
  • Over 170 million square feet of Class A office space is expected to come online this year and next according to the CoStar data. 
  • Also according to CoStar, less than 60% of that space has been leased, well below the historical average of 74 percent.  
  • The American Hotels & Lodging Association said nearly one fourth of U.S. hotels face possible foreclosure as owners fall behind on loans. 

As the Times rightly pointed out, it’s important to remember that a lot of the oversupply in commercial real estate was happening before the pandemic. For example, the shift to e-commerce had already caused more than 10,200 stores to close in 2019, according to CoStar. The Times also pointed out that companies were already cutting back on office space well before the pandemic—especially in high-priced major cities. A key driver of that trend is demographics. As younger generations become a larger proportion of the workforce, their familiarity and comfort with technology makes working remotely increasingly more possible.  

Case in point, Moody’s Analytics said average office space per worker had fallen to 127 square feet by 2019, from nearly 300 square feet per employee in the 1980s. To me, that implies acres of cubicles, instead of rows of private offices. Even with that backdrop, 30% to 40% of that space goes unused on a typical workday. 

As one CRE expert told the Times, “For the real estate community, this represents a moment in time to think about current assets, how they’re being used and what future options might be.” 

I actually find that statement encouraging. 

Take retail. Brick and mortar buildings will always be needed, but their use is changing.  The shopping experience and how it relates to work/life balance has become the new model that developers and owners need to embrace. I would have liked the Times to drill into this more.  

Retail + Entertainment = Retail tainment 

Living in the shadows of the second largest shopping mall in America, I remember when mega-malls first became popular. The customer experience was all about going to the mall for “retail-tainment.”  Shopping

wasn’t just about purchasing things you needed; it was about being entertained, being seen and keeping current with the latest trends.  

Now that model has shifted online as consumers take advantage of free shipping, free returns, and trying clothes on at home. People still go to retail centers to eat, work out and relax. But, when they want to purchase things like clothing, they tend to gravitate towards specialty boutique stores with brands that they know and trust. 

Retail centers should now think about converting to entertainment centers and cluster the personal services that people want AND need, such as beauty salons, restaurants and the more recent phenomenon of urgent care providers. Additionally, people want to live near where they work and where they play. 

Gyms and workout centers were once shunned by landlords.  The perception was that those customers would only go to the gym, take up parking spaces and not visit other tenants of the property.  Those same gyms are now called lifestyle centers and are now embraced as they drive traffic to a location.  Has anyone noticed how workout clothing has become accepted while running errands?  And as people’s work life has shifted from commuting to telecommuting, workers are spending more time at home and want more services and entertainment options closer to where they live. 

Developers and owners would do well to incorporate the entertainment component (i.e. boutique retail, restaurants and entertainment venues), with outdoor space, green space, dog parks, etc. to continue to attract new residents. 

We see the retail-tainment concept again and again in proposals being submitted for the Penn’s Landing project along the Delaware River in Philadelphia.  One development group is proposing a new arena for the NBA’s Philadelphia 76ers as part of their plan to develop over seven acres of waterfront.  
I see this as the future of commercial real estate, not the end of it. 

Conclusion 

If you or someone close to you has concerns about their real estate holdings in their portfolio (or wants to put some recent gains to work), please don’t hesitate to reach out. 

Concerned About Filing an Extension?

R-E-L-A-X

LETTER FROM OUR MANAGING PARTNER

In September of 2014, future Hall of Fame NFL quarterback Aaron Rodgers had a simple message for Green Bay Packers fans who were panicking over the team’s 1-2 start to the season.  “Five letters here just for everybody out there in Packer land:  R-E-L-A-X,” he said on his weekly radio show, spelling the word out for effect.  I share this on the heels of last week’s announcement from the Treasury Department that the federal tax deadline, which had been extended to July 15th because of the coronavirus pandemic, would not be extended further.  “After consulting with various external stakeholders, we have decided to have taxpayers request an extension if more time is needed,“ Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said in a statement. 

            An EXTENSION….a word that can make taxpayers as uneasy as a football fan whose team is failing to live up to expectations (rather than spell it out as Rodgers did, I went with the equally annoying all-caps approach).  Even in normal tax years with an April 15th deadline, I have encountered taxpayers anxious about the thought of filing an extension.  As someone who has prepared and reviewed tax returns for multi-family office clients for over 20 years and has worked closely with the IRS, I can assure you that filing an extension for your tax return is not only incredibly easy, but encouraged by the IRS if it will allow you the extra time needed to file a complete and accurate tax return.  I recently confirmed this position in a conversation with an audit manager within the Global High Net Worth division of the IRS.  He could not have been more adamant that not only does an extended tax return not result in increased audit risk, but on the contrary, it is more likely to avoid the need to amend a hastily filed return, which can trigger an audit. 

            It is understandable that you would prefer to file your return as soon as possible and officially turn the page from the prior tax year and, if your information is available, go right ahead.  As taxpayers’ investment portfolios have become more complex, however (and income increases), so too does the likelihood that an extension will be necessary.  90.7% of taxpayers who earned between $50,000 and $75,000 in 2018 filed their tax returns by the original April 15th deadline, without requiring an extension.  Those percentages begin to decrease, however, as taxpayer income increases.

            The reality is that the more complex your investment portfolio becomes, the greater likelihood that one or more of those investments was made through a partnership or LLC which files its own tax return and then issues a Form K-1 to you as the partner/member.  Unlike your W-2 or 1099 from an investment account, these forms are not due to the IRS until September 15th (if extended from the original March 15th deadline).  Many of these entities are waiting on K-1’s themselves and so there can be a trickle-down effect which makes it impossible for the returns to be filed by the original due date.  The good news is that in 2017 the IRS decided stop torturing tax preparers and moved the extended due date for partnerships and LLC’s from October 15th to September 15th, which leaves a full month when an individual should have 100% of their tax information in order to complete their return (you can imagine the stress for tax preparers prior to 2017 who were waking up on October 15th still waiting on a K-1 that was needed to file a client’s return that was due THAT SAME DAY). 

            So how does this work?  It is important to note that the extension is to file your tax return, not to pay any tax that is due, and so you will need to pay – normally by April 15th, but this year by July 15th – what you expect to owe when you actually file your taxes later in the year.  Other than that, it is as simple as filing a one-page form (Form 4868) for an automatic six month (three months this year) extension to file your taxes.  As implied, the request is automatic, and the IRS does not even have to approve it.  You then have until October 15th to gather your information and file your tax return. 

            The 2014 Packers followed Rodgers’ calming words to rebound from their rough start to finish the season 12-4 and advanced to the NFC Championship.  If you don’t expect to have received all of your tax information by July 15th, or you just don’t have the time to gather it, don’t panic, R-E-L-A-X, and file Form 4868 to extend the due date until October 15th.  The IRS does not make many accommodations for taxpayers – you should not feel guilty about utilizing this one. 

SCAMS RELATED TO THE COVID-19 CORONAVIRUS PART II

BY CHRISTINA BELFIGLIO, OFFICE OPERATIONS & MANAGEMENT

Scammers continue to exploit the Covid-19 virus for their benefit. They have created scams seeming to come from the CDC and from employees. Below are scams to which our office has been alerted in the last week.

Please continue to share your stories so we can alert others.
SCAMS to watch out for:

  • Calls from Utility Companies – callers claim to be from utility companies and claim that the utility will be shut off for non-payment. They request a form of payment over the phone in order to keep the service on. Some jurisdictions have required utility companies to halt shut-offs and fees for delinquent payments. Be skeptical of any calls from utility companies at this time.

  • Video Conferencing Breaches – many reports of Meeting Bombings (strangers accessing your meeting) have surfaced in the news. Now Zoom-themed websites are popping up with malicious code built in. Ensure that you are using the actual app by going directly to their website. When possible enable security measures such as meeting passwords and an approval process for accepting members once logged in. Additional information for Zoom meetings can be found in this CNet article. https://www.cnet.com/news/zoom-every-security-issue-uncovered-in-the-video-chat-app/

  • Medicare Scams – offers for Medicare benefits related to Covid-19, such as Coronavirus package or a Covid-19 kit. Typically they request personal information such as your bank information, Social Security and/or Medicare numbers.

  • Monetary Relief – Fraudulent calls, texts, and emails purporting to be from the Social Secuirty Administration, IRS, Census, USCIS, and the FDIC. “These fake government messages might say that you’re approved for money, can get quick relief payments, or get cash grants due to the Coronavirus. Scammers might also promise you small business loans, or send a (phishing) alert that a check is ready to be picked up. These are all scams, and none of those messages come from a government agency.”

  • Direct Deposit changes – some businesses are seeing increased imposter emails purporting to be from employees requesting changes to their direct deposit accounts. Do not reply to the email. Contact the employee directly using the information provided in their personnel file. If the email is deemed to be a scam report it to your IT

  • department so they can blacklist the email address. Blacklisting the email address will block all emails from that address company-wide.

  • Text Messages – The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has received reports of texts appearing to be from a “next door neighbor.” Sample text:

    From my next door neighbor

Just received this…from good friend of mine who works for the CDC

Please be advised, within 48 to 72 hours the president will evoke what is called the Stafford Act. Just got off the phone with some of my military friends up in DC who just got out of a two hour briefing. The president will order a two week mandatory quarantine for the nation. Stock up o whatever you guys need to make sure you have a two week supply of everything. Please forward to your network.

Discredited SCAMS which have been circulated:

  • Thieves Handing out Masks laced with Chemicals –
    • The claim – thieves are going door to door distributing free masks. They insist the recipient try it on. The masks are laced with a chemical that renders the wearer unconscious. The thieves then rob the homeowner.

  • The Verdict – this has been reported as a FALSE claim by multiple groups including Snopes.com, Reuters.com, and Politifact.com.

Tips for recognizing and avoiding phishing emails

Here are some ways to recognize and avoid coronavirus-themed phishing emails. Like other types of phishing emails, the email messages usually try to lure you into clicking on a link or providing personal information that can be used to commit fraud or identity theft. Here’s some tips to avoid getting tricked.

  • Beware of online requests for personal information. A coronavirus-themed email that seeks personal information like your Social Security number or login information is a phishing scam. Legitimate government agencies won’t ask for that information. Never respond to the email with your personal data.

  • Check the email address or link. You can inspect a link by hovering your mouse button over the URL to see where it leads. Sometimes, it’s obvious the web address is not legitimate. But keep in mind phishers can create links that closely resemble legitimate addresses. Delete the email.

  • Watch for spelling and grammatical mistakes. If an email includes spelling, punctuation, and grammar errors, it’s likely a sign you’ve received a phishing email. Delete it.

  • Look for generic greetings. Phishing emails are unlikely to use your name. Greetings like “Dear sir or madam” signal an email is not legitimate.

  • Avoid emails that insist you act now. Phishing emails often try to create a sense of urgency or demand immediate action. The goal is to get you to click on a link and provide personal information — right now. Instead, delete the message.

Tips for Staying Protected

  • Report suspected scam to the Federal Trade Commission at ftc.gov/complaint.

  • Update the software, virus and malware protection on all of your devices.

  • Always Question the source and validity of the information you receive. Go directly to the source instead of clicking links or opening attachments.

  • Check with your IT department at work to verify if a message is a scam or legitimate. If you receive something that appears to come from someone in your company send them a separate message or call them to verify the validity.

  • Be Aware by signing up for the FTC’s Consumer Alerts to get the latest news on scams.

https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USFTCCONSUMER/subscriber/new?topic_id=USFTCCONSUMER_8
See our previous scam report: https://www.fortis-wealth.com/2020/03/24/scams-related-to-the-covid-19-coronavirus/
Sources:
https://www.fcc.gov/covid-scams
https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/blog/2020/04/scammers-are-using-covid-19-messages-scam-people

SCAMS RELATED TO THE COVID-19 CORONAVIRUS

March 24, 2020
by Christina Belfiglio
Office Operations and Management

Scammers wasted no time in exploiting the Covid-19 virus for their benefit. They have created scams seeming to come from the CDC and from employers; and they hid viruses in what appear to be links to official Covid-19 data.

SCAMS to watch out for:

  • Covid-19 Home Tests – you cannot purchase test kits to use from home. Any sites, calls, or door-to-door sales that claim this is a scam. Don’t be fooled if they say they are from the Red Cross, it’s a scam.

  • Phishing Emails or texts are messages containing attachments or links which, once launched download malicious software (malware). The malware could allow cybercriminals to take control of your device, record keystrokes, and/or access your personal information. Go to the source itself instead of clicking links in emails or on social media. Known scams include messages claiming to be from:
    • The World Health Organization (WHO) or from Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General of WHO. The actual link to WHO is https://www.who.int/
    • The U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC). The actual link to the CDC is: https://www.cdc.gov/
    • Employers – Emails may appear to come from an employer and contain a link to a policy.
    • Messages threatening to infect you or your family with the Coronavirus. These messages may reveal a password you once used which was found in a data dump from a recent breach. The message may demand funds in the form of bitcoin or gift cards.

  • Financial Relief – This email campaign promises to send a check, possibly as part of the government stimulus package. They request your personal and bank account information as well as your social security number. The government already has some, if not all, of this information. The government will not email you regarding a stimulus check.

  • Fake Charities – with any disaster or major health event scammers use those instances to take advantage of your generosity. Research the charity and go directly to the organization’s website instead of donating via links. Requests for donations via cash, gift card, or wiring money are scams. It’s best to pay by credit card so you can dispute the charge if you find out it is not legitimate. For more tips on donating responsibly and research charities review information on the Federal Trade Commission website: https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/features/how-donate-wisely-and-avoid-charity-scams#researchhttps://www.consumer.ftc.gov/features/how-donate-wisely-and-avoid-charity-scams

  • Robocalls – recorded calls that may range from virus treatments to work-at-home schemes. Do not push any buttons as this may lead to more robocalls. Hang up and if possible, block the number from your phone.

Tips for recognizing and avoiding phishing emails

Here are some ways to recognize and avoid coronavirus-themed phishing emails.

Like other types of phishing emails, the email messages usually try to lure you into clicking on a link or providing personal information that can be used to commit fraud or identity theft. Here’s some tips to avoid getting tricked.

  • Beware of online requests for personal information. A coronavirus-themed email that seeks personal information like your Social Security number or login information is a phishing scam. Legitimate government agencies won’t ask for that information. Never respond to the email with your personal data.

  • Check the email address or link. You can inspect a link by hovering your mouse button over the URL to see where it leads. Sometimes, it’s obvious the web address is not legitimate. But keep in mind phishers can create links that closely resemble legitimate addresses. Delete the email.

  • Watch for spelling and grammatical mistakes. If an email includes spelling, punctuation, and grammar errors, it’s likely a sign you’ve received a phishing email. Delete it.

  • Look for generic greetings. Phishing emails are unlikely to use your name. Greetings like “Dear sir or madam” signal an email is not legitimate.

  • Avoid emails that insist you act now. Phishing emails often try to create a sense of urgency or demand immediate action. The goal is to get you to click on a link and provide personal information — right now. Instead, delete the message.

Tips for Staying Protected

  • Report suspected scam to the Federal Trade Commission at ftc.gov/complaint.

  • Update the software, virus and malware protection on all of your devices.

  • Always Question the source and validity of the information you receive. Go directly to the source instead of clicking links or opening attachments.

  • Check with your IT department at work to verify if a message is a scam or legitimate. If you receive something that appears to come from someone in your company send them a separate message or call them to verify the validity.

Sources:
https://us.norton.com/internetsecurity-online-scams-coronavirus-phishing-scams.html

COVID-19 Scam Roundup – Week of 3/16/20

https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/blog/2020/03/ftc-coronavirus-scams-part-2

Tax Update: Tax Filing Deadline Extended to July 15th

A LETTER FROM YOUR FORTIS FAMILY OFFICE TAX TEAM:

The tax filing deadline for returns normally due April 15th, has been extended until July 15th. Earlier in the week, the Internal Revenue Service extended the federal income tax payment deadline for most individuals and corporate taxpayers. Today, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin shared this news via Twitter “We are moving Tax Day from April 15 to July 15. All taxpayers and businesses will have this additional time to file and make payment without penalties and interest.“

We are still awaiting official guidance from the IRS and from the majority of the States. We are continually monitoring this situation and will report accordingly.

Fortis Wealth LP is continuing our operations with a remote workforce. We encourage you to send us your tax documents as soon as possible (preferably in electronic format) so that we can continue providing the service that you have come to expect.

As always, we encourage you to reach out to us with any questions or concerns.

Jennifer Fields
Director of Tax

jfields@fortis-wealth.com

IRS Provides guidance on the April 15th deadline for Taxpayers

FROM YOUR FORTIS FAMILY OFFICE TAX TEAM

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin announced yesterday that the IRS will postpone the April 15th tax payment deadline for most individual and corporate taxpayers. Payments can be deferred for up to three months and taxpayers will not be subject to interest and penalties.

Individual taxpayers can defer up to $1 million of tax liability and corporations get an extension on up to $10 million of liability.

The Individual tax filing deadline of April 15th remains in effect and we encourage you to send us your 2019 tax documents as soon as possible.
The federal government is encouraging those taxpayers with refunds to file as soon as possible to help stimulate the economy.

We are closely monitoring the details of this relief as well as other relief associated with the coronavirus. We will keep you informed as more details become available.

Fortis Wealth is fully operational and our client-focused operations continue as normal.

As always, we encourage you to reach out to us with any questions or concerns.


Jennifer Fields
Director of Tax

Maggie & Terri of Fortis Wealth – Contributors to Women to Watch Media with Sue Rocco!

Maggie Corado & Terri McDermott have been contributing to Women to Watch as the “Finance Watch” team, bringing listeners a brief segment on financial education during each show for the past year.

Women to Watch is a Premier Global Media Platform for Women Leaders. Initially created as a weekly radio show, Women to Watch™ developed into digital, print, social media, events and video production programs that tell “the real story behind the titles” of some of the most accomplished women in history.

We will be posting each week’s “Finance Watch” segment here, in case you missed the show!

Listen Now! Ways Fortis can Help Clients Navigate Common Financial Issues
Listen Now! Defining Market Lingo – Stocks
Listen Now! Defining Market Lingo – Bonds


Go to http://women2watch.net, to listen live, or browse content!